Solid State Lighting: From Technology to Marketplace

A workshop on April 13 at the University of Toronto will discuss important issues relating to solid-state lighting.

The University of Toronto SSLNet is pleased to present "Solid State Lighting: From Technology to Marketplace," a day-long intensive workshop on Tuesday April 13th addressing relevant issues faced by lighting designers and purchasers in producing and identifying quality SSL products.

Canada and the University host Prof. Karl Leo of Technische Universität Dresden, Germany, the keynote speaker, Organic LED expert, and founder of Novaled, who will discuss the status of OLED technology, and what lighting markets can expect in the not-to-distant future.

Marci Sanders of D&R, Program Developer and Manager of the department of energy’s Lighting Facts program will present a overview of the US Department of Energy's various LED lighting programs, featuring Lighting Facts. The workshop will also feature talks on LED luminaire lifetime, driver and optics designs to maximize LED product output, efficiency and lifetime. The afternoon session will feature a panel discussion with academic and industrial experts discussing various technological progresses, market challenges and user expectations, including LEDs Magazine’s own Brian Owen, Contributing Editor.

Organic LED have developed in the past 20 years from a lab curiosity to a successful product. Despite large advances in performance and lifetime, future applications in OLED TV and lighting require further progress. Leo will first review some of the basic operating principles of OLED. He will discuss work on improving efficiency and lifetime of OLED.

“We have recently shown that the electrical doping concepts can be successfully applied in OLED devices: the concept of molecular doping allows to realise green OLED devices with the highest efficiencies reported so far, well exceeding the efficiency of current inorganic GaN devices!” says Leo.

He will also discuss recent results on white OLED which have recently achieved efficiencies comparable to fluorescent tubes, opening the path to a new form of high-efficiency area lighting devices. “Surprisingly, the field of OLED is currently dominated by evaporated small-¬molecule devices, despite the fact that initially, polymer OLED which allow liquid processing were seen as the more direct and cost-effective approach to devices,” added Leo. The event takes place next week on Tuesday April 13th, 2010 from 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. at the Bahen Centre for Information Technology on the U of T campus, Toronto, Ontario.

This event and the information is important for architects, engineers, contractors, interior & lighting designers, specifiers and commercial end-users, SSL lighting manufactures, agents & distributors, component suppliers, academics, energy efficiency departments & organizations and government agencies should also consider attending.

Download a registration form

For further details, visit www.optics.utoronto.ca/sslnet or email events@optics.utoronto.ca.

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